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CMS Considering Potential Alternatives to “Two-Midnight Rule”

On May 19, 2014, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) announced that it is considering new ways to define and pay for hospital short-stays. In October 2013, CMS implemented the “Two-Midnight Rule” with the goal of bringing clarity to billing for Part A inpatient hospital admissions. However, the Rule has been faced with ongoing criticism and significant pushback from hospitals.

The Two-Midnight Rule was intended to provide clear guidelines regarding when hospitals should bill for inpatient versus outpatient services, such as observation. The rule provides that at the time of admission, the admitting physician must document an expectation that a patient receive 2 midnights or more of hospital care. The medical record must contain sufficient information to support this expectation as a condition of payment. Dr. Ann Sheehy testified at the House Health Subcommittee May 20, 2014 that the rule “does not distinguish between clinical populations because it is a time based policy with no basis in sound clinical judgment.”

The distinction between inpatient and outpatient hospital services can significantly impact how much Medicare pays a hospital for the services it provides to beneficiaries. In fact, Medicare has historically paid nearly 3 times more for a short inpatient stay than an observation stay on average. The House Health Subcommittee heard testimony from HHS Regional Inspector General Jodi Nudelman that differing payment rates have resulted in some hospitals admitting short-stay inpatients more than others. In fact, she testified that some hospitals attribute over 70% of their inpatient stays to short stay admissions while others admit short-stay inpatients less than 10% of the time.

Growing confusion surrounding the rule and potential unintended consequences have made it clear that the Two Midnight Rule must be carefully reevaluated. Now CMS is considering new alternatives and is seeking comments on an alternate pay system. According to CMS Deputy Administrator, Sean Cavanaugh, one potential alternative could be modeled after the per-day payment system that is already used for patients who transfer from one hospital to another during an episode of care. Additionally, CMS is soliciting comments on whether reimbursement rates for specific inpatient services should be capped at the outpatient rate for the equivalent service.

For more information on the Two Midnight Rule and other regulatory issues, please contact Abby Pendleton, Esq. or Jessica Gustafson, Esq. at (248) 996-8510 or via email at apendleton@thehlp.com or jgustafson@thehlp.com.

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