ATTORNEY ADVERTISING

RECOVERY AUDIT CONTRACTOR (RAC)
We have extensive experience with RAC audits and appeals, working directly with healthcare entities subject to RAC audits.
STARK ANDANTI-KICKBACK
We have represented Independent Diagnostic Testing Facilities (“IDTFs”), mobile leasing entities, radiology group practices, and other imaging providers.
STAFF PRIVILEGES & LICENSING MATTERS
We provide assistance and guidance through the legal process focused on the goal of resolving your matter successfully and efficiently.
Published on:

On July 10, 2019, United States Attorney Matthew Schneider announced the indictment of Dr. Vasso Godiali of Bay City, charged with health care fraud in the amount of $60 million, and money laundering for financial transactions involving approximately $49 million in proceeds derived from the scheme.

According to the indictment, Dr. Godiali submitted false and fraudulent claims for the placement of stents in dialysis patients and for the treatment of arterial blood clots; exploited medical billing software to improperly maximize payments from Medicare, Medicaid, and Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan; submitted false and fraudulent claims to Medicaid, Medicare, and Blue Cross for services not rendered; and “unbundled” claims by exploiting modifier-59 to falsely claim he was performing many separate and distinct procedures, when in fact he was entitled to a single reimbursement for a single procedure. The indictment further alleges that Dr. Godiali utilized six corporations through which he laundered approximately $49 million, which he ultimately used to fund investment accounts at multiple financial institutions, and that he engaged in money laundering by using proceeds from his scheme to pay property taxes on a Houghton Lake, Michigan, residence.

The United States Attorney’s Office also filed a related civil lawsuit seeking the forfeiture of approximately $39.9 million seized from accounts controlled by Dr. Godiali and/or related to four separate real estate transactions.

Published on:

Anyone practicing midwifery in the State of Michigan will be required to be licensed in midwifery beginning August 1, 2019.  The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) began accepting applications on May 6, 2019.

Under Public Act 417, which established Part 171 in the Public Health Code, an individual may not engage in the practice of midwifery unless licensed or otherwise authorized by article 15 of the Public Health Code. Those who are not licensed as of August 1, 2019, may be in violation of the public health code (there are statutory exemptions from licensure which can be found in MCL 333.17105(3)) and subject to significant penalties.

For additional information on the above matter or any matter related to healthcare professional licensing in Michigan, please contact Robert S. Iwrey, Esq. at 248-996-8510 or riwrey@thehlp.com.

Published on:

The Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) recently launched a new licensing platform for physicians (MDs and DOs) and 10 other licensed professions called the Michigan Professional Licensing User System (MiPLUS). The new system is intended to provide an improved interface for licensees and consumers and reduce mailing delays. All professional licensees will be required to apply for a new license or renew their current license by using the new online platform. Under the new system, license expirations dates will correspond with the licensee’s date of initial licensure and will be for the full length of the license cycle.

Some of the MiPLUS features are:

  • Individuals can apply online, track the status of their application, and renew their license.
Published on:

IMPORTANT NEWS FOR HOME HEALTH AGENCIES – In a fact sheet released July 11, 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) detailed its annual update to the Medicare rate, as well as its plan for the implementation of the Patient-Driven Groupings Model (PDGM) and other proposals for calendar year (CY) 2020, which can be downloaded here. Despite the pushback in recent months from lawmakers, home health stakeholders, and organizations such as the National Association for Home Care & Hospice, CMS indicates their intentions of moving forward with many of the provisions included in PDGM.

Perhaps chief among Thursday’s proposed rule is CMS’s plan to phase out pre-payments for home health agencies (HHAs). This would eliminate the ability of HHAs to submit a Request for Anticipated Payment (RAP) in order to obtain 50-60% of the anticipated payment at the beginning of a patient’s care episode. According to CMS, the plan for the elimination of RAPs was brought on by “a marked increase in RAP fraud schemes perpetrated by existing home health agencies that receive significant upfront payments, never submit final claims and then close for business.” CMS is proposing that RAP payments for existing providers will be phased out over the next year, with full elimination occurring by 2021.

However, CMS’s proposed rule also includes a 1.3% – or $250 million – projected increase to the Medicare payments made to HHAs. This rate increase reflects a 1.5% home health payment update as well as a 0.2% decrease due to reductions made by the new rural add-on policy.

Published on:

By Adrienne Dresevic, Esq. of The Health Law Partners, P.C., Olivia Dresevic JD expected 2020

On June 1, 2019, Joanne Chiedi assumed the role of Acting Inspector General at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) following Daniel R. Levinson’s resignation. Ms. Chiedi recently sat down with the Compliance Perspectives Podcast to speak on key issues she addressed at the 2019 Compliance Institute. This article will highlight some of Ms. Chiedi’s insight regarding how healthcare providers can maintain successful compliance and oversight considering the rapid innovative changes occurring in Healthcare.

Innovation and Technology in the world of Healthcare

Published on:

On June 17, 2019, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a settlement option for certain IRF appeals pending at any of the four fee-for-service Medicare administrative appeals levels: the Medicare Administrative Contractor (MAC), qualified independent contractor (QIC), the Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals (OMHA) Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), and/or the Medicare Appeals Council (Council) stage.

The settlement option is limited to IRF appellants that filed appeals at the MAC for redetermination on or before August 31, 2018 that are pending or eligible for appeal at the MAC, QIC, OMHA or Council stages of appeal.

Under the IRF settlement initiative, CMS will pay 69 percent of the net payable amount for most claims associated with pending IRF appeals.  However, CMS will pay 100 percent of the net payable amount for the following:

Published on:

The Office of Medicare Hearings and Appeals (OMHA) has announced an expansion of the Settlement Conference Facilitation (SCF) program available to the appellant community as of June 7, 2019. Previously, the option of an SCF was only available to appeals filed on or before November 3, 2017.

An SCF is “an alternative dispute resolution process designed to bring the appellant and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) together to discuss the potential of a mutually agreeable resolution for Medicare Part and Part B claims.” Claims that are eligible for SCF must be at the OMHA level or the Medicare Appeals Council (MAC) level.

An employee of OMHA is designated as a facilitator for the duration of an SCF, whose main purpose is to facilitate payment negotiations between the appellant and OMHA, working to make the two parties see the relative strengths and weaknesses of their positions. The facilitator does not act as a fact finder during this process, nor do they make determinations on the qualities of the claims.

Published on:

Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the nondiscrimination provision that prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, age, and disability in any health program that receives federal funding. On May 24, 2019, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) proposed a new rule that would maintain vigorous civil rights enforcement and revise certain provisions that a federal court has said are likely unlawful.

Existing civil rights laws and regulations were originally applied to Section 1557 of the ACA. These include:

  • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, prohibiting discrimination on the basis of race, color, and national origin;
Published on:

Following a circuit split over the statute of limitations on whistleblower actions, the Supreme Court (SCOTUS) issued a unanimous decision on May 13, 2019. This decision held that, regardless of government intervention, a longer statute of limitations may apply to qui tam lawsuits under the False Claims Act (FCA).

Two types of limitation periods govern whistleblower actions under Section 3731(b)(2):

  1. The action must be brought within six years after the violation; or,
Published on:

In order to secure a new Beneficiary and Family Centered Care Quality Improvement Organization (BFCC-QIO) contractor, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has temporarily paused both Short Stay and Higher Weighted Diagnosis-Related Group (HWDRG) reviews.

Previously, two BFCC-QIOs have performed HWDRG reviews since 2014 and Short Stay reviews since 2015 for all 50 states and three territories: Kepro and Livanta. Moving forward, one organization will handle both types of reviews on a national basis.

Short Stay reviews provide an opportunity for BFCC-QIOs to ensure doctors and hospitals are maintaining compliance with the Medicare Part A payment policy for inpatient admission. BFCC-QIOs assumed responsibility of conducting Short Stay reviews on October 1, 2015. Previously, the reviews were conducted by Medicare Administrative Contractors (MACs) and Recovery Auditors.

Contact Information