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November 23, 2015

Providers Likely To Face Higher Penalties For Fraud and Regulatory Violations

On November 2, 2015 the President signed The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, requiring that civil monetary penalties must be raised to account for inflation, followed by an annual review for further increases. Providers accused of False Claims Act (FCA) violations are likely to see an increase as high as 40% over the current penalty ranging from $5,500 to $11,000. Higher penalties may add up quickly in FCA cases, which generally involve hundreds of alleged tainted claims.

This could potentially have a negative impact on providers that have earmarked monies for quality of care improvement efforts who must now spend the money on paying higher penalties. The threat of higher penalties might also influence a provider's decision to settle FCA cases due to the risk of astronomical penalties that may be imposed.

Budget Deal Raises Stakes for False Claims, Civil Monetary Penalties [link]

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November 20, 2015

Per Alabama Court The Government Must Show More Than Difference of Opinion to Prove Falsity in False Claims Act (FCA) Action

After a ten week trial, a federal court in Alabama has granted a hospice care provider, Aseracare Inc.'s motion for a new trial in a False Claims Act (FCA) case. The Government alleged that this hospice care provider knowingly submitted false claims to Medicare for patients who were not terminally ill and thus did not qualify for hospice benefits. However, the Alabama federal court determined that there was reversible error in the jury instructions that left out that the FCA requires proof of an objective falsehood and that a minor difference in opinion is not enough to show falsity. At this time, the court is considering summary judgment given that the government maintains its only evidence for proving falsity is expert testimony and medical records of the patients at issue.

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November 12, 2015

NPDB Revamps its FAQs

Recently, the National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) website revised both the content and appearance of its Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) pages in order to provide more insight and better guidance to its users based upon its call center statistics and other customer feedback. The revised questions and answers are now organized into new categories by audience: Health Care Professionals, Organizations, and Other Topics. There is also a FAQ search bar that allows the user to type in a keyword to search for a topic. See:

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November 9, 2015

Investigations Mounting Against Widespread Pharmacy Fraud Claims to Military Health Program

The Wall Street Journal has reported that Federal prosecutors are investigating widespread fraud, in at least four states, by compounding pharmacies in claims submitted to TRICARE--the health-insurance program that insures over 9 million U.S. military members (active, guard/reserve and retired) and their families. Some of the allegations include: false billings, physicians writing prescriptions despite not meeting the beneficiaries in person, and improper kickbacks being received in exchange for referring business to a government agency.

"U.S. Targets Pharmacies Over Soaring Claims to Military Health Program" [link]

The major increase in spending on compounded drugs is believed to be the primary reason behind a $1.3 billion deficiency in the military's health-care budget earlier this year. As a result, funds had to be redirected from other programs to compensate for the shortage and Prosecutors are considering and pursuing civil and criminal charges against the pharmacies, physicians and drug marketers.

This action by Federal prosecutors is yet another example of the increased enforcement by federal authorities against the pharmaceutical industry seen in the last six months.

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November 4, 2015

Congress Considering Additional Legislation to Help Curb Medicare Prescription Drug Abuse

It was just released that Congress is contemplating whether Medicare will be able to restrict at-risk drug abuse beneficiaries to a limited number of pharmacies and providers when they seek narcotics. Currently, Medicaid and the Veterans Affairs (VA) are able to impose these restrictions, but Medicare is not.

If successful, this action will help prevent opioid abuse by averting doctor shopping and encouraging physicians and insurers to aid patients battling drug abuse.

"Congress Looks to Curb Medicare Prescription Drug Abuse"

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November 3, 2015

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General has released their Work Plan for Fiscal Year 2016

The United States Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General ("HHS-OIG") has released its Work Plan for Fiscal Year 2016. This plan summarizes new and continuing areas of review and activities that HHS-OIG plans to pursue as well as describing its primary objectives. The newest additions to the work plan are:

• Medical device credits for replaced medical devices
• Medicare payments during Medicare Severity Diagnosis Related Groups (MS-DRG) payment window
• Content Management System (CMS) validation of hospital-submitted quality reporting data
• Skilled nursing facility prospective payment system requirements
• Orthotic braces-reasonableness of Medicare payments compared to amounts paid by other payers
• Osteogenesis stimulators-lump-sum purchase versus rental
• Orthotic braces-supplier compliance with payment requirements
• Increased billing for ventilators
• Ambulatory surgical centers-quality oversight
• Physicians-referring/ordering Medicare services and supplies
• Anesthesia services-non covered services
• Physician home visits-reasonableness of services
• Prolonged (E & M) services-reasonableness of services
• Histocompatibility laboratories-supplier compliance with payment requirements
• Accountable Care Organizations: Strategies and Promising Practices
• Medicare payments for unlawfully present beneficiaries in the United States-mandated review
• Medicare payments for incarcerated beneficiaries-mandated review
• Content Management System (CMS) management of ICD-10 implementation
• Medicare Advantage organization practices in Puerto Rico
• Medicare Part D beneficiaries' exposure to inappropriate drug pairs
• Medicare Part D Eligibility Verification transactions
• Part D Pharmacy Enrollment
• Increase in prices for brand-name drugs under Part D
• Specialty drug pricing and reimbursement in Medicaid
• Express Lane Eligibility
• State agency verification of deficiency corrections
• Medical loss ratio-recoveries of MCO rebates from profit-limiting arrangements
• Review of States' methodologies for assigning Managed Care organization payments to different Medicaid FMAPs
• Managed long-term-care reimbursements
• Center for Disease Control (CDC)-oversight of the Select Agent Program
• Controls over networked medical devices at hospitals
• Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-tobacco establishment compliance with the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act
• Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)-compliance with Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Requirements
• IHS-change card program review
• NIH-controls over subcontracting of NIH grant and contract work
• Controls over the preparation and receipt of select agent shipments
• Review of Office for Human Research Protections compliance evaluations to ensure human subject protection
• Foster Care-States' protocols for the use and monitoring of psychotropic medications for children in foster care
• States' implementation of guardian ad litem requirements
• Consumer Operated and Oriented Plan Loan Program-CO-OP compliance with requirements and CMS monitoring activities
• Allowability of contract expenditures
• Rollup of State-based marketplace eligibility determination audits and Content Management System (CMS) oversight
• Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)-compliance with Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) requirements

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General has released their Work Plan for Fiscal Year 2016

The HHS-OIG expects significant recoveries in audit receivables, investigative receivables and non-HHS investigative receivables resulting from their Work Plan, as well as tremendous savings in legislative, regulatory, and/or administrative actions.

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November 2, 2015

Significant Changes to Stark Regulations Finalized in 2016 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

In July, we blogged about the major Stark Law provisions in the 2016 Proposed Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (the "Proposed Rule"). On October 29, 2015, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services ("CMS") released the final 2016 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule (the "Final Rule") (available here), with few changes between the proposed rule and final rule as it related to the Stark provisions. The Final Rule will be published in the Federal Register on November 5, 2015. These are the first major changes to the Physician Self-Referral Rule (Stark Law) since 2009.

CMS stated that the Stark Law updates are meant to accommodate health care delivery/payment system reform, reduce burdens, facilitate compliance, clarify certain applications of the Stark Law, and issue new Stark exceptions. Below is a brief summary of the provisions adopted in the Final Rule:

(a) CMS adopted the proposed Stark exception for recruitment assistance and retention payments from hospitals, federally-qualified health centers (FQHCs), and rural hospital clinics (RHCs) to physicians to assist with employing non-physician practitioners (NPPs) in their geographical area. The only change from the Proposed Rule is the addition of a definition for the geographical area serviced by the FQHCs and RHCs, which is:

The "geographic area served" by a federally qualified health center or a rural health clinic is the area composed of the lowest number of contiguous or noncontiguous zip codes from which the federally qualified health center or rural health clinic draws at least 90 percent of its patients, as determined on an encounter basis. The geographic area served by the federally qualified health center or rural health clinic may include one or more zip codes from which the federally qualified health center or rural health clinic draws no patients, provided that such zip codes are entirely surrounded by zip codes in the geographic area described above from which the federally qualified health center or rural health clinic draws at least 90 percent of its patients.

(b) CMS standardized the various terms used for the principle of "takes into account" referrals (e.g., variations include "based on" or "without regard to"). CMS settled on standardizing the language to "takes into account" the volume or value of referrals.

(c) CMS clarified that the regulations in 42 CFR 411.357(t) regarding retention payments in underserved areas is correct. The Final Rule clarifies that the retention payment must not exceed the lesser of an amount equal to 25 percent of the physician's current annual income averaged over the previous 24 months.

(d) CMS clarified that the Stark exception requiring that a lease arrangement be set out in writing does not require a single formal contract, but a collection of documents may satisfy the "writing" requirement. CMS did so by replacing the term "agreement" with the term "lease arrangement" throughout the regulation.

(e) CMS extended the "holdover" lease arrangement provision from six months to indefinitely (as opposed to a definite, but longer than six-month period as contemplated in the Proposed Rule). The new holdover lease language is applicable so long as the lease arrangement met the conditions of the exception prior to its expiration, the holdover is on the same terms and conditions as the immediately preceding arrangement, and that the holdover continues to satisfy the requirements of the exception.

(f) CMS revised the language of the exception to the definition of "remuneration" for items/devices/supplies that are used solely for one or more of the six purposes (i.e., collection, transportation, processing, storing, ordering, or communicating the specimen/results). The revision clarifies that the item can be used for more than one of the six purposes, so long as it is used solely for one or more of those purposes.

(g) CMS adopted the language in the Proposed Rule with regard to the clarification that employees or independent contractors do not "stand in the shoes" of their physician organization's arrangements "unless they voluntarily stand in the shoes of the physician organization as permitted under 42 CFR 411.354(c)(1)(iii) or (c)(2)(iv)(B).

(h) CMS expanded the exception for ownership of publicly traded securities with the language from the Proposed Rule to include protection for "trading on an electronic stock market or over-the-counter quotation system in which quotations are published on a daily basis and trades are standardized and publicly transparent."

(i) CMS added a new exception for timeshare lease arrangements between a physician and a hospital or unrelated physician organization for the use of premises, equipment, personnel, items, supplies, or services if certain conditions are met. The exception does not apply to advanced imaging, radiation therapy, or clinical/pathology laboratory equipment (other than equipment used to perform CLIA-waived laboratory testing).

(j) CMS added language to clarify that the physician-owned hospital disclosure requirements are not met by posting the ownership interest disclosure on a social media website, electronic patient payment portal, electronic patient care portal, or an electronic health information exchange.

Continue reading "Significant Changes to Stark Regulations Finalized in 2016 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule" »

October 27, 2015

U.S. Government's Plan to Hold Individuals Accountable for Corporate Wrongdoing

A top priority of the Department of Justice (DOJ) is battling corporate fraud and now the focus is on holding the individuals who carry out the wrongdoing accountable. The DOJ released a memorandum this month setting forth six key steps that should be taken by federal law enforcement agents in any investigation of corporate misconduct: (1) to be qualified for any cooperation credit, corporations must provide the Department all applicable facts about the individuals involved in the corporate misconduct; (2) criminal and civil corporate investigations should target individuals from the commencement of the investigation; (3) routine communication must be present between criminal and civil attorneys handling corporate investigations; (4) no corporate resolution will provide protection from criminal or civil accountability for any individual, unless it is an out of the ordinary circumstance; (5) before resolution of corporate cases, a plan to resolve similar individual cases must be memorialized; and (6) civil attorneys should focus on individuals as well as the company and determine if suit should be filed against the individual wrongdoer(s) based on considerations above that wrongdoer's ability to pay.

"U.S. Department of Justice's Plan for Individual Accountability for Corporate Wrongdoing"

As a result of these changes, healthcare corporations are likely to see a rise in the number of individual prosecutions. Healthcare corporations are well advised to seek the early assistance of learned, experienced healthcare legal counsel when first contacted by any agents regarding federal inquiries or federal payor audits (e.g., Medicare or Medicaid audits) to limit individual criminal or civil liability.

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October 23, 2015

President Obama Announces New Steps to Fight Opioid Abuse Epidemic

On October 21, 2015, President Obama announced new initiatives to fight the nation's opioid abuse epidemic. The President discussed several plans for doing so, such as: expanding access to drug treatment, increasing the number of physicians who can prescribe a drug used to treat opiate addiction, doubling the number of providers that can prescribe a drug to reverse the effects of an opioid overdose, and directing the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to invest $8.5 million in opioid addiction prevention.


In Michigan and New York, prescription drug abuse has become a high priority for law enforcement officials including enforcement actions directly targeting physicians, dentists and other prescribers as well as dispensers such as pharmacies and pharmacists. Such health care providers are well advised to take appropriate care to prevent the abuse and misuse of controlled substances and to maintain proper documentation of the medical necessity and legitimacy of such prescriptions.

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October 21, 2015

Recent Increase in NCI ZPIC Audit Activity

In the last few weeks, we have seen a flurry of activity in Zone Program Integrity Contractor ("ZPIC") audits for the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services ("CMS"). Recently, many providers - and home health agencies, in particular - have received ZPIC audit notifications from NCI, Inc. ("NCI") In April 2015, CMS awarded NCI the ZPIC contract for Zone 3, which covers Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. NCI is charged with performing program integrity investigations, making coverage and coding determinations, implementing administrative actions, coordinating fraud and abuse mitigation activities, developing a list of entities requiring monitoring, and assisting in the investigation and prosecution of fraud and abuse cases.
Home health agencies are under major scrutiny, and it appears that NCI has turned its attention to combating fraud and abuse in the home health arena. Any providers and suppliers who have received a ZPIC audit notification should contact an experienced healthcare attorney to assist you with the process. The Health Law Partners are experienced in working with providers and suppliers through the ZPIC audit process. For more information, please contact Adrienne Dresevic, Esq., at or (248) 996-8510.

August 25, 2015

Moratoria on Enrollment of Ambulance Suppliers and Home Health Agencies Extended

On July 29, 2015 the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services ("CMS") announced that it is extending the temporary moratoria on the enrollment of new home health agencies, subunits, and branch locations ("HHA") and part B ambulance suppliers for an additional six months.
Section 6401(a) of the Affordable Care Act added section 1866(j)(7) to the Social Security Act (the "Act") to provide the Secretary with authority to impose a temporary moratorium on the enrollment of new Medicare, Medicaid, or CHIP providers and suppliers if the Secretary determines a moratorium is necessary to prevent or combat fraud, waste, or abuse under these programs.
Based on this authority CMS initially imposed a moratoria on the enrollment of new HHA and part B ambulance suppliers in a notice issued on July 31, 2013 (78 FR 46339). This was subsequently extended and expanded in a notice issued on February 4, 2014 (79 FR 6475). Additional extensions of the moratoria by notices issued on August 1, 2014 (79 FR 44702) and February 2, 2015 (80 FR 5551).
The initial July 31, 2013 moratoria applied to HHAs in Miami-Dade County, Florida and Cook County, Illinois, as well as surrounding counties, and part B ambulance suppliers in Harris County, Texas and surrounding counties. The February 4, 2014 notice expanded the HHA moratoria to Broward County, Florida; Dallas County, Texas; Harris County, Texas; and Wayne County, Michigan and surrounding counties. The moratoria on the enrollment of part B ambulance suppliers was also expanded in the February 4, 2014 notice to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and surrounding counties.
In deciding to impose and extend the moratoria, CMS considered "qualitative and quantitative factors suggesting a high risk of fraud, waste, or abuse" within these geographic locations. CMS relied on law enforcement experience with "ongoing and emerging fraud trends and activities through civil, criminal, and administrative investigations and prosecutions." CMS also consulted with HHS-OIG regarding the extension of the moratoria. Prior to imposing the moratoria, CMS reviewed Medicare data and found no concerns related to beneficiaries accessing HHAs or ambulance suppliers within these geographic locations. State Medicaid agencies and other CMS state partners determined that the moratoria would not create issues related to access to care for Medicaid or Children's Health Insurance Program ("CHIP") beneficiaries.
CMS will determine whether to extend or lift the moratorium before extending the moratorium further. If the moratoria is extended or lifted, CMS will publish notice in the Federal Register. Once a moratorium is lifted, the providers or suppliers types that were unable to enroll because of the moratorium will be designated to CMS' high screening level for 6 months from the date the moratorium is lifted.
The attorneys at The Health Law Partners have a significant amount of experience counseling home health agencies, ambulance suppliers and other medical providers throughout the United States on moratoria and enrollment issues, as well as how to maintain compliance with applicable regulations once enrollment screening begins.

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August 19, 2015

OIG Scrutinizes Overlap Between Physician-Owned Hospitals and Physician-Owned Distributors

The government does not like Physician-Owned Hospitals ("POH"). The government also does not like Physician-Owned Distributors ("POD"). The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services ("CMS") and the Office of Inspector General ("OIG") have taken several steps recently to crack down on what it views as abusive PODs and POHs. In a brand new memorandum report, the OIG reviewed twelve physician owned hospitals to determine the overlap between POHs and PODs of spinal devices. This study was completed as a follow up to the 2013 Spinal Devices Supplied by Physician-Owned Distributors: Overview of Prevalence and Use report. CMS expressed interest in the ownership overlap following discussion related to the 2013 report.

The OIG used publicly available information and information from CMS's Provider Enrollment Chain and Ownership System ("PECOS") to determine whether a physician had an ownership interest in both a hospital and a POD that sold spinal devices to the same hospital. The OIG found one physician who had an ownership interest in both a hospital and a POD selling spinal devices to the same hospital. The OIG admits to the possibility of more overlapping ownership than the one instance found, but they state that none were found using the methods applied here.
The limited information available to determine common ownership between hospitals and PODS purportedly raises concerns of transparency among Medicare providers and vendors who sell implantable devices to providers. The government wants transparency to make sure providers do not violate referral and billing prohibitions under the Physician Self-Referral Law (Stark). Transparency also contributes to ensuring providers comply with OIG exclusions and the Anti-Kickback Statute. The OIG states that transparency can also implicate patient safety and quality of care because ownership can impact the clinical decision making of a physician.

Surgical implants, such as the spinal devices manufactured by the PODS in this report, are most commonly physician preference items. Physician preference items are items where the choice of brand and type of device are determined, or strongly influenced, by the physician rather than the hospital where the surgery takes place.

In a March 26, 2013 Special Fraud Alert, the OIG, citing physicians as the gatekeeper as to the brand and type of device, stated that there is a "strong potential for improper inducements between and among the physician investors, entities, device vendors, and device purchasers." This issue was cited in the 2011 Congressional report titled,Physician Owned Distributors (PODs): An Overview of Key Issues and Potential Areas for Congressional Oversight which stated that "[t]he very nature of PODs seem to create financial incentives for physician investors to use those devices that give them the greatest financial return and that, in the process, patient treatment decisions may be based on personal financial gain."

In conclusion, the OIG believes that there is limited transparency as to the ownership of PODs and, to a lesser extent, hospitals. The OIG believes that CMS's Physician Payments Sunshine Act ("Sunshine Act") (42 CFR §§ 403.900 - 403.914) will increase the availability of information to permit the identification of POD owners. The Sunshine Act requires manufacturers and group purchasing organizations to report ownership and investment interests held by physicians to CMS.

The attorneys at The Health Law Partners have a significant amount of experience counseling physicians, hospitals and medical device manufacturers throughout the United States on the Physician Self-Referral Law, the Anti-Kickback Statute, and the Sunshine Act, among many other state and federal regulations applicable to the field of health care law. We have the experience and knowledge to ensure compliance with these sophisticated health care regulations so as to remedy any issues that may come from the common ownership examined in this OIG report.

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August 17, 2015

OIG Issues Two Reports on Fraud and Abuse in Medicare Part D

In June, the Office of Inspector General ("OIG") issued two new reports on Medicare Part D titled: Ensuring the Integrity of Medicare Part D (available here) and Questionable Billing and Geographic Hotspots Point to Potential Fraud and Abuse in Medicare Part D (available here).
In the Ensuring the Integrity of Medicare Part D report, the OIG outlines the progress it has made in addressing - and the work still needed to protect against - fraud in the Medicare Part D program. According to the OIG, Part D fraud relates to two main issues: "1) the need to more effectively collect and analyze program data to proactively identify and resolve program vulnerabilities, and prevent fraud, waste, and abuse before it occurs; and (2) the need to more fully implement robust oversight to ensure appropriate payments, prevent fraud, and protect beneficiaries." The OIG recommends that CMS take the following steps to combat fraud and abuse:
(1) require plan sponsors to report all potential fraud and abuse to CMS and/or the MEDIC;
(2) require plan sponsors to report data on the inquiries and corrective actions they take in response to fraud and abuse;
(3) expand drug utilization review programs to include additional drugs susceptible to fraud, waste, and abuse;
(4) implement an edit to reject prescriptions written by excluded providers;
(5) exclude Schedule II drug refills when calculating final payments to plan sponsors at the end of each year;
(6) seek authority to restrict certain beneficiaries to a limited number of pharmacies or prescribers;
(7) develop and implement a mechanism to recover payments from plan sponsors when law enforcement agencies do not accept case referrals;
(8) determine the effectiveness of plan sponsors' fraud and abuse detection programs; and
(9) ensure that plan sponsors' compliance plans address all regulatory requirements and CMS guidance.
In the Questionable Billing and Geographic Hotspots Point to Potential Fraud and Abuse in Medicare Part D report, the OIG addresses drug abuse in the Part D Program, including controlled substance abuse and the diversion of non-controlled substances for illegal purposes. The OIG analyzed prescription drug event records from 2006-2014. The study found that:
• Since 2006, Medicare spending for commonly abused opioids has grown faster than spending for all Part D drugs;
• Pharmacies with questionable billing raise concerns about pharmacy-related fraud schemes; and
• Geographic hotspots for certain non-controlled drugs point to possible fraud and abuse.
The OIG recommends that the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid continue "to conduct investigations of pharmacies with questionable billing when warranted and to monitor pharmacy billing" and to fully implement OIG's previous recommendations."
The publication of these two reports highlights the government's continued scrutiny on pharmacies and prescribing physicians. Pharmacies and physicians should ensure that they have effective compliance programs in place to internally combat fraud and abuse.

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August 17, 2015

OIG Issues New Advisory Opinion on Free Introductory Visits Offered to Patients by Home Health Providers

On August 6, 2015, the Office of Inspector General ("OIG") issued Advisory Opinion No. 15-12 (available here) regarding a home health provider (the "Requester") offering free introductory visits to patients who have chosen it for home health care. The OIG concluded that this arrangement does not violate the federal Anti-Kickback Statute ("AKS").
Under the proposed arrangement, the Requester does not have any involvement in the patient's home health selection process. Instead, a physician, another health care professional, or discharge planner/case manager presents the patient with a list of home health providers from which to choose. If the patient selects the Requester as its home health provider, then the Requester contacts the patient to schedule a free introductory visit with one of its liaisons. The purpose of the introductory visit is to provide the patient with: (1) an overview of the home health experience; (2) contact lists for the Requester's administrative and clinical staff; and (3) pictures of the patient's care team.
In reaching the conclusion that the arrangement does not generate prohibited remuneration under the AKS, the OIG considered the following facts:
• The Requester does not pay or offer any remuneration to the physicians or other individuals involved in the patient's provider selection process;
• The introductory visit does not involve any diagnostic or therapeutic services reimbursed by federal health care programs or by third-party payors, and the services provided by the liaison during the introductory visit do not require clinical training;
• The liaison does not contact the patient until after receiving notice that the patient has chosen the Requester as his or her home health provider; and
• The Requestor does not submit claims for or claim costs associated with the introductory visit.
The OIG reasoned that any benefits received by the patient during the introductory visit were for the primary purpose of facilitating the patient's transition to home health care, and the intangible worth to patients does not implicate the AKS. The OIG emphasized that when analyzing whether a service has economic value to patients, "the absence of a paying market for such service is not dispositive." According to the OIG, such an absence may be the result of factors other than the service having little or no value, including because: (1) the service is still new and emerging in the marketplace; or (2) the market has been distorted by the availability of free services. The key takeaway here is that AKS liability is not avoided simply because the service is not reimbursable.

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June 25, 2015

United States Supreme Court Rules to Uphold Federal Subsidies Created by the Affordable Care Act

June 25, 2015

On June 18, 2015, the United States Supreme Court decided the case of King, et al. v. Burwell, Secretary of Health and Human Services, et al., upholding federal subsidies for taxpayers who buy health insurance on the federal government's webpage. The potential loss of the subsidies was seen by commentators as a significant threat to the Affordable Care Act.

Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the 6-3 majority of the Court, finding that though the text of the law was ambiguous, the Affordable Care Act was passed "to improve health insurance markets, not destroy them." Thus, the Court found that the tax credits that are available to the state health insurance exchanges should also be available to insurance purchased on the federal government's page, which is relied upon by as many as 37 states that do not have their own insurance exchanges. Chief Justice Roberts' opinion was joined by Justices Kennedy, Ginsburg, Breyer, Sotomayor and Kagan. Justice Scalia dissented, and was joined by Justices Thomas and Alito.

The attorneys at The Health Law Partners have a significant amount of experience in providing guidance to healthcare stakeholders as to developments in healthcare law, regulation and policy throughout the United States. For more information regarding such matters, please call (248) 996-8510 or visit