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Articles Posted in Health Law News

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On July 29, 2016, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”) announced that it is expanding statewide (and extending for an additional six (6) months), the temporary enrollment moratoria on new Medicare Part B home health agencies (“HHAs”) in Florida, Texas, Illinois, and Michigan.  The statewide expansion also applies to Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (“CHIP”).

The expansion and extension also apply to non-emergency ground ambulance suppliers in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Texas.  CMS is also lifting the temporary moratoria on all Medicare Part B, Medicaid, and CHIP emergency ground ambulance suppliers.  These changes are effective as of July 29, 2016.

CMS also announced the Provider Enrollment Moratoria Access Waiver Demonstration (“PEWD”).  Under PEWD, CMS can allow exceptions to enroll providers and suppliers in the moratoria areas if access to care issues are identified and for the development and improvement of methods of investigating and prosecuting fraud in Medicare, Medicaid, and CHIP.

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The United States Department of Health and Human Services has new actions planned to address the opioid crisis. The buprenorphine rule has been finalized, which allows physicians who have waivers to prescribe buprenorphine products (e.g., Suboxone) for up to 100 patients for 1 year or more to obtain a waiver to treat up to 275 patients. Also, per Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) many doctors have reported feeling financial pressure to overprescribe opioids since Medicare payments to hospitals are tied to scores on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey, therefore CMS is recommending that the pain management questions on the HCAHPS be eliminated. Lastly, Indian Health Service is mandating that its opioid pharmacists and prescribers check their state prescription drug monitoring program database before dispensing or prescribing any opioids. In an effort to improve and expand prescriber education and training programs, HHS will also be conducting over a dozen studies on pain treatment and opioid misuse.

To learn more about the latest actions by HHS see the HHS July 6, 2016 news release.

Robert S. Iwrey, Esq., a founding partner of The Health Law Partners, P.C., practices in all areas of healthcare law and devotes a substantial portion of his practice assisting clients in pharmacy legal matters including compliance, third party payor audits, government investigations, state licensing and DEA registrations. For more information regarding this article or pharmacy legal matters, please contact Robert S. Iwrey, Esq. at (248) 996-8510 or (212) 734-0128 or riwrey@thehlp.com.

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New rules published on June 30th, 2016 in the Federal Register could dramatically change the regulatory enforcement landscape for healthcare providers, with fraud penalties nearly doubling under the False Claims Act and the Anti-Kickback Act.

The False Claims Act (which in pertinent part imposes penalties on healthcare providers for submitting false claims to a government program) has had a penalty range of $5,500 to $11,000 per claim since 1996, but such penalties will increase to a range of $10,781 to $21,563 per claim. Penalties for violations of the Anti-Kickback Act (which prohibits physicians from referring Medicare beneficiaries to an entity in which they have a financial relationship for designated health services) will correlatively be substantially enhanced, from $11,000 per violation to $21,563 per violation.

The basis for these adjustments is the Federal Civil Monetary Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act of 1990, which requires that civil monetary penalties be adjusted regularly in order to account for inflation. These changes are set to take effect on August 1st, 2016. Public comments on the changes can be submitted to the Justice Department until August 29th, 2016.

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On Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision that recognizes implied certification as a viable theory under which to pursue False Claims Act cases against healthcare providers. Implied certification can impose liability if a contractor has engaged in a lie by omission, for instance, failing to disclose its noncompliance.

In the case, Universal Health Services v. Escobar, the court ruled that companies are subject to False Claims Act liability and the implied certification theory, but only if: (1) claims from healthcare providers request payment and make “specific representations about the goods or services provided” and (2) an organization’s failure to disclose noncompliance with “material” requirements would equate to “misleading half-truths.”

This case could result in a significant increase in False Claims Act cases being pursued against healthcare providers.

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The HHS Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) has begun issuing notices for Phase 2 HIPAA Audits applicable to covered entities and their business associates. In Phase 2, OCR will review the policies and procedures adopted and employed by covered entities and their business associates to satisfy standards and implementation specifications of the Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules. Phase 2 audits will primarily be desk audits, however, some on site audits will occur.

Please be sure to check your spam filters and junk email folders because notices for Phase 2 HIPAA Audits are sent via email. The initial email notice for a Phase 2 HIPAA Audit seeks to confirm an entity’s address and contact information. Following confirmation of this contact information OCR will send a pre-audit questionnaire.

We have a number of clients who are undergoing Phase 2 HIPAA Audits and our experience in responding to these audits will minimize any potential disruption to your healthcare operations. Contact Clinton Mikel, Esq., at cmikel@thehlp.com, or at 248-996-8510, for guidance and counsel on how best to respond to any Phase 2 HIPAA Audit notice that you have received.

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On Tuesday, May 10, 2016, Clinton Mikel, a Partner at The Health Law Partners and Chairman of the eHealth, Privacy and Security Interest Group of the American Bar Association Health Law Section, will be a guest speaker at Politico’s “Outside, In: Unhealthy Hacking: Medical Privacy in the Age of Cyber Attacks,” a live event featuring leading voices in health care, technology, and policy discussing privacy and cybersecurity in the healthcare sector.

In addition to Clinton Mikel, panelists include Texas Representative Will Hurd, Leslie Krigstein, VP of CHIME (College of Healthcare Information Management Executives), and Deven McGraw, Deputy Director for Health Information Privacy, HHS Office for Civil Rights, among others.

Among the issues the panelists will address are the following: Can health care providers afford security? Is the cyber-kidnapping of hospitals the new normal? Is greater health information exchange going to lead expanded, dangers/hacks? Is the need to secure records another driver toward consolidation in health care, because of the costs? Do we need more congressional or regulatory action to assure our records are safe and secure?

Politico will live stream the May 10 event at http://www.POLITICO.com/live beginning at 5:30 p.m. EST.
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Adrienne Dresevic, Esq., of The Health Law Partners, PC, and Kathleen DeBruhl of DeBruhl Haynes, The Health Law Group, are pleased to announce the American Bar Association Health Law Section’s Physicians Legal Issues Conference on June 9-10, 2016, in Chicago, Illinois. This annual conference is attended by both attorneys and physicians and is held in conjunction with the Chicago Medical Society and the American Association for Physician Leadership.

This year’s theme is “Thriving in a Time of Change: Attorneys and Physicians Working Together”. Physicians continue to face challenging odds in a rapidly evolving healthcare market–whether remaining independent, adapting to “employment” by an integrated system, or addressing consolidated payer markets with little or no negotiating power. This unique conference offers physicians, attorneys and their administrative partners an opportunity to hear how these issues are being addressed by physicians and how physicians can succeed at maintaining viable medical practices that offer quality services at their core.

Physicians and their legal counsel will have access to national speakers and will be educated on key issues affecting employer and hospital relationships, business and industry responses to payer consolidation and market control, and every day “survival” techniques in hospital and private practice settings. Whether you are a physician or entering the field of healthcare law, this conference will provide valuable insight and strategies that can improve your practice.
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Please join The Health Law Partners, P.C., in congratulating Adrienne Dresevic (a Founding Shareholder), and Clinton Mikel (a Partner), for earning what has been described as the “Pulitzer Prize of Legal Writing”.

The Burton Award for Distinguished Legal Writing, which is run in association with the Library of Congress and co-sponsored by the American Bar Association, is earned each year by 35 exceptional authors nationwide.

Submissions for the Distinguished Legal Writing Award are extremely competitive. The award is generally selected by professors from Harvard Law School, Yale Law School, Stanford Law School, and Columbia Law School, among others.

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The HHS Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) has announced that it will begin the 2016 Phase 2 HIPAA Audit Program, the next phase of audits of covered entities and their business associates. In Phase 2, OCR will review the policies and procedures adopted and employed by covered entities and their business associates to satisfy standards and implementation specifications of the Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules. Phase 2 audits will primarily be desk audits, however, some on site audits will occur. OCR will evaluate the results and procedures used in the Phase 2 audits to develop a permanent audit program.
The Phase 2 audit process begins with OCR sending an email to covered entities and business associates requesting verification of an entity’s address and contact information. OCR will then send pre-audit questionnaires to obtain information about the size, type, and operations of covered entities and business associates. This information will be used in conjunction with other information to create potential audit subject pools.
If a covered entity or business associate does not respond to OCR’s email request to verify contact information or the pre-audit questionnaire, OCR will use publically available information to verify contact information or respond to the questionnaire. Thus, covered entities and business associates should be aware that ignoring OCR’s emails will not keep them from being part of potential audit subject pools.
OCR will post updated audit protocols on its website closer to when it will begin to conduct the 2016 audits. The audit protocol will be updated to reflect HIPAA Omnibus Rulemaking.
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In U.S. ex rel. Wall v. Circle C. Construction, Case #14-6150, 2016 WL 423750 (6th Cir. Feb. 4, 2016), the 6th Circuit Court held that damages in false certification cases should be based on the difference between the value of the items or services the government should have received and the value of the items or services the government actually received. The holding, which arose in the non-healthcare context of a construction contract, arguably applies in healthcare matters where medically necessary items or services were furnished pursuant to referrals that violated AKS or Stark laws and thus the government did not sustain any actual damages. A court could then find that the treble damage provision under the False Claims Act is not applicable and the government’s damage recovery is limited to the $5,500-11,000 per claim penalty.
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