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DEA ELEVATES HYDROCODONE-COMBINATION PRODUCTS TO THE MORE RESTRICTIVE CATEGORY OF SCHEDULE II DRUGS

In an attempt to combat prescription drug abuse, on August 22, 2014, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (“DEA”) published a final rule (here) elevating Hydrocodone-combination products (“HCPs”) to the more restrictive schedule II category of drugs under the Controlled Substances Act (“CSA”). Since the enactment of the CSA in 1971, HCPs have been classified as schedule III drugs. Under the final rule, effective October 6, 2014, DEA registrants are required to adhere to more stringent prescribing, dispensing, security, and recordkeeping requirements with respect to HCPs. The final rule applies to “all pharmaceuticals containing hydrocodone currently on the market in the United States,” which includes, but is not limited to, Vicodin, Lortab, Hycodan, and Tussionex.

How Will The New Rule Affect Prescribers?

Under the final rule, prescribers may no longer authorize refills for HCP prescriptions. Previously, authorized prescribers could prescribe a 30-day supply of HCPs with up to five refills. Under the final rule, practitioners may issue multiple prescriptions authorizing patients to receive up to a 90-day supply of HCPs, provided certain regulatory requirements are met. However, the DEA will allow pharmacists to refill legitimate HCP prescriptions until April 8, 2015, if the prescription allows refills and was issued prior to October 6, 2014. Additionally, like other schedule II controlled substances, prescribers will no longer be able to “call in” or “fax in” HCP prescriptions to a pharmacy absent an emergency.

Moreover, prescribers must prepare for a potential increase in the need for physician office visits for patients using HCPs and should expect greater regulatory scrutiny concerning the prescribing of HCPs. In fact, the DEA cautioned that prescribers must determine whether multiple prescriptions (i.e., up to the allowed 90-day supply of HCPs) are appropriate for a particular patient, and they must base their decision “on sound medical judgment and in accordance with established medical standards.”

How Will The New Rule Affect Manufacturers, Distributors, and Pharmacies?

Under the final rule, manufacturers, distributors, and pharmacies must meet heightened security and recordkeeping standards. More specifically, manufacturers that repackage or re-label HCPs must obtain a quota in order to repackage or re-label HCPs. However, the DEA will allow repackaging and re-labeling without meeting the quota requirement until December 8, 2014.

For distributors, the primary change is that they must physically store HCPs in a vault that meets certain requirements. For pharmacies, the final rule requires them to use a DEA Form 222 in order to obtain HCPs from a distributor. Pharmacies will also be required to keep HCP records separate or readily retrievable. In addition, pharmacies should move quickly to update ordering systems with new National Drug Code numbers.

Conclusion.

The DEA published the final rule merely 45 days prior to the effective date, and health care entities and professionals must move quickly to implement the more stringent schedule II requirements. Furthermore, it is important to remember that each state has its own rules regarding controlled substance prescribing that must be followed as well. Prescribers and dispensers of controlled substances are well advised to follow the more restrictive/conservative requirements when there is a conflict between federal and state law. E.g., under the subject final rule, any legitimate prescription for HCPs that are issued before October 6, 2014 that authorizes refills may be dispensed by a pharmacy if such dispensing occurs before April 8, 2015; however, under Michigan’s Administrative Rules, a prescription for a controlled substance listed in schedule II shall not be refilled. Thus, in Michigan, as of October 6, 2014, prescribers should not write prescriptions with refills for HCPs and dispensers should not dispense HCPs pursuant to a prescription refill. Additionally, health care entities and professionals should review any state specific legal or regulatory requirements that emerge as a result of this final rule. For example, the Ohio Board of Pharmacy issued a companion publication (here) addressing Ohio-specific compliance issues related to the final rule. While the rescheduling is not without opposition, the change is here and the October 6, 2014, effective date is right around the corner.

For more information, please contact Robert S. Iwrey at (248) 996-8510 or riwrey@thehlp.com.

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